Archive for August, 2016

Maine Bed and Breakfast Is Being Given Away In Contest!

August 23rd, 2016 by Mariah

Calling all dreamers, writers and entrepreneurs. Want to build a new life sparked by creativity and fueled by a burning desire to be your own boss? Imagine what you can do. Imagine who you can become, if you take that leap of faith.

“The opportunity of a lifetime is only achieved…..if you act within the lifetime of the opportunity.”

 

FreedomHouse

 

WELCOME TO FREEDOM HOUSE B and B ESSAY CONTEST.

A modest entry fee of $150.00 (US Funds) and an Essay of 200 words or less can win you this beautiful farmhouse style bed and breakfast located in the center of Dover-Foxcroft, ME, walking distance to shops, theater, restaurants, banks, courthouse and many more. Just think you can fulfill a dream for the cost of a nights stay in a beautiful bed and breakfast. Simply click on the ENTRY, adhere to the RULES, download and away you go.

A little history about the innkeepers.

Empty nesters Dennis & Chris Aplanalp originally from the West Coast, have owned and operated Freedom House B and B for nearly 13 years. They purchased this 1880’s farmhouse in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine wanting to own and operate a Bed and Breakfast. After a year and a half of renovations they opened for business. Owning a bed and breakfast was everything they dreamed it would be and MORE! In its 13 years, Freedom House B and B is well established with a strong following of guests. After the birth of their ninth grandchild, Chris and Dennis are wanting to spend more quality time with their children and grandchildren and have decided to retire. This essay contest is a unique way to share a dream of theirs with someone else. Freedom House B and B has become “the place to stay” in the area.

VISIT THE OFFICIAL CONTEST WEBSITE HERE!

Rugged, remote, otherworldly Utah

August 10th, 2016 by Mariah

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CNN - Sure, you can go on a week’s safari in Africa or spend seven days cycling in New Zealand, but one of the world’s most spectacular spots is closer than you think.

Frequently and unfairly overlooked, Utah is a “state of mind … sculpted by wind, water and time,” its tourism slogans tout.
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That apt description only hints at the natural force and geological artistry shaping southern Utah’s jaw-dropping national park landscapes.
Last year, the area’s five national park headliners — Zion, Bryce Canyon, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands and Arches — collectively drew about 7 million visitors from around the world.
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From ancient petroglyphs and shooting stars to hiking, kayaking, biking, backpacking, mule riding and river rafting, there’s no lack of intriguing pursuits in southern Utah.

Skiers tackle Colorado park’s highest peaks

August 10th, 2016 by Mariah

Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado (CNN) - When wintertime hits rugged Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, roads close and fair-weather hikers and campers go home.

But for a couple of adventurous backcountry skiers, the adrenaline-filled fun is just beginning.
A year and a half ago, skiers Austin Porzak and Dan Sohner set out to ski and photograph the 50 highest peaks in Rocky Mountain National Park, an adventure they describe as surreal and religious. To be clear, we’re not talking resort skiing with convenient high-speed chairlifts zipping to the summits with long, groomed ski runs down.
Many of these peaks have never been skied before.
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These adventure addicts are climbing peaks sometimes topping 14,000 feet with ice axes and ropes.
Expeditions that involve staying overnight on the slopes require them to carry 50-pound packs on their backs filled with food and tents in addition to climbing and avalanche safety equipment, skis, boots and camera gear.
You “must be 100% in the moment” because of all the unknowns and the constantly changing conditions, said Sohner, 28, who’s a professional photographer when he’s not tackling mountains.
Fear is essential to this risk-taking pursuit, Sohner said. ”If you aren’t scared about something every single day, you’re probably not being safe.”
After reaching the summit, Sohner and Porzak strap on their skis and head down, making their own fresh paths through unpredictable terrain that often involves deep snow, ice and jagged rocks.
The climb up takes anywhere from 10 to 22 hours, and the ski down can be as fast as 30 minutes.

A New Crop of Bed and Breakfasts

August 10th, 2016 by Mariah

Healthy Demand for Intimate Lodging Is Spurring a New Generation of Investor-Innkeepers

The term “bed-and-breakfast” is no longer code for teddy bears, floral bedspreads and doilies.

Karen Lynch, a 49-year-old former stay-at-home mom, and her husband Dan, a 56-year-old IT specialist at Chevron, recently invested nine months and $600,000 gutting an 1860 Victorian home, purchased for $1.5 million. They kept the historic wainscoting and hardwood floors, but replaced the old-fashioned décor with more modern equivalents. Named the Inn on Randolph, the B&B opened in May 2012 and costs $225 to $425 a night. The couple live next door in a restored, 1,600-square-foot bungalow that backs up to the property.

Camden Harbour Inn

In February 2007, Raymond Brunyanszki and his partner Oscar Verest bought what was originally a carpenter’s home in the 1870s for $2.8 million. They then spent an additional $2 million on renovations, which included adding a restaurant, reconfiguring the layout and shipping furniture from Italy, Belgium and Spain. Called the Camden Harbour Inn in Maine, the inn’s priciest rooms run around $1,500 a night during high season and are decorated with all-white walls accented by pops of color like purple and orange. “People will change their entire itinerary if these rooms are booked,” says Mr. Brunyanszki, a 44-year old former hospitality consultant, who adds that guests have included members of Boyz II Men.

The fresh look reflects the vitality of the bed-and-breakfast industry, which is attracting a new breed of innkeepers who, instead of being hobbyists, are looking for sustainable businesses. Today there are 15,000 B&Bs in the U.S., up from estimates of between 5,000 and 8,000 in the 1980s and early 1990s, says Jay Karen, CEO of the Professional Association of Innkeepers International (PAII), a B&B trade group.

Bed-and-breakfasts, which grew in popularity in the 1800s as mainstays for travelers, usually were family-run enterprises offering a handful of rooms. They cropped up in rural areas too remote to support larger hotels and often distinguished themselves with homey vibes. “People liked the idea of welcoming the weary traveler and showing off their cooking skills or the antiques they collected over the years,” Mr. Karen says.

Click here to read the full story.